by Claire Browning

With world leaders failing and New Zealand ranked in the bottom five of the world's worst emitters for climate policy response, conservation campaigners have to think differently about ways to help nature weather the coming storm

The IPCC synthesis report is in and, hopes Bill McKibben:

The Environmental Protection Agency hearing into seabed mining for phosphate on the Chatham Rise is exposing questions about uncertainty - many big unknowns, including whether the applicant has done its job. If environment groups win this battle, what does it mean for the wider war?

Out on the Chatham Rise, the ridge jutting into the waters off Christchurch and extending out beyond the Chathams, Chatham Rock Phosphate has a mining permit and is now seeking EPA approval for its project to mine phosphate for fertiliser, at depths untried anywhere else in the world.

Putting a price on something ... usually, the first step to selling it off, or compensating for its loss. Pricing nature is on the agenda in Wellington this week.

Think about the things that are everything to you: a child, love, the air you breathe, your life.

What price would you put on those things? How do you value them? Could you express the value in dollar terms? And the answer’s pretty obvious.

The court with “the potential to affect New Zealanders’ day-to-day quality of life more than any other court in the judicial system” is on the ropes. The RMLA speaks out

Yesterday, thanks to footwork from the Resource Management Law Association, the rumour of recent weeks was confirmed.

Cabinet papers did exist, it appeared, confirming that Ministerial consideration was being given to doing away with the Environment Court.

New Zealanders have been asked to think about our constitution - what it is that makes us or, as one judge described it, “the mirror of a nation’s soul”

 

Constitutionally, New Zealand is in a very sad minority.

Steven Joyce’s Budget 2013 announcement says that his ‘New Zealand Story’ project will be all about innovation and resourcefulness, our Maori heritage, and a ‘welcoming, friendly’ approach. I think the Emperor has no clothes, and it's about time somebody said so

100% pure New Zealand claims now lie exposed, as an embarrassment and a risk to our Government.

Government's gathering pace, in a way that ought to give us all serious pause - because it rips apart more than our constitutional fabric.

“New Zealand is a remorselessly democratic country.” -- Geoffrey Palmer

In 1977, 341,159 New Zealanders joined the petition of Gwenny Davis to Parliament.

Government gets bolder. Meanwhile, Forest & Bird Ambassador Sir Alan Mark launches a public appeal for a Wise Government Response to five crises confronting New Zealand

Styled by participant Gareth Renowden as 'a loose affiliation of New Zealand’s great and good', really, it’s 'people like us'.

Look deeper into RMA reforms and you might find it's more exciting than you think: an Environment Minister taking her axe to urban trees, and the latest in a series of “democracy deficits” - this time affecting Auckland

Wake up, New Zealand. Yo, Auckland!

I want you - the 87 percent of you who live in a city or town in New Zealand - to have a think about trees. What do trees mean to you?

The launch tonight aboard the Rainbow Warrior of Greenpeace NZ’s clean economy report recalls the time New Zealand turned away from nuclear energy. Now, as then, we’re at an historical crossroads. But where is the Economic Development Minister?

Forty years ago, New Zealand had to decide whether we’d plan for a nuclear power supply. In the end, we made some other choices: a lot of hydro, some gas, some coal.

Renewable energy options have come a long way since then; so has nuclear of course, but then so has our stance on nuclear-free.