Auckland

One new seat added in Auckland. But that single proposed seat has ramifications that will ripple across the city with some surprising winners and losers

The new draft electoral commission boundaries for Auckland would add just one new seat but magically create two, and in doing so clip suburbs from here and there for a rather different patchwork city.

The Representation Commission this morning announced:

Is the new rule that anyone holding public office who has an affair must resign? Come on. That’s setting the bar ridiculously high. It would mean resignations in parliament and in councils across the country.

I don’t want our politicians to be super human, different to the rest of us. I do expect them to be honest, good at the job, and politically courageous. The prurient focus of some outraged bloggers and journalists while they salivate over the sordid details of this affair is nothing short of voyeuristic. For others it’s political maliciousness, posing as moral outrage. 

There has been heaps of hype around the America's Cup, but beyond our national ego and sporting competitiveness, there is one very practical reason to hope Emirates Team New Zealand can somehow pull one out of the bag

The America's Cup was a balm and an emotional boon last week – a fun way to start the day and a national ego boost. It became a much more grim vigil; a duty of hope. And after this morning, despair has set in.

David Cunliffe's shadow cabinet reshuffle has been seen as quite measured and Cunliffe himself says it puts Labour on a war footing. But perhaps the most telling appointment has gone largely unremarked

The rise of Sue Moroney and Louisa Wall, the predictable demotions of Clare Curran and Trevor Mallard, the left-right tension on Labour's "economic team", the redeployment of David Shearer and Jacinda Ardern, plus the wink to Phil Goff that 30 years is long enough alongside the nod to Annette King that there's still work for her to do after almost as long...

Increasing the supply of housing is only part of the solution. Demand needs to be shored up. That means changing incentives so that wage earners can compete with investors.

When run down villas in Sandringham are fetching up to a $1 million, the average family can't afford to buy the average house.

 Here are two things that the problem of affordability isn't:

It's not a problem of not enough houses being built in the wops. People want to live where they work and play.