beneficiaries

Auckland's first-ever beneficiary 'impact' demonstrates poverty of policies as well as of people 

Almost unnoticed in the rush to Christmas, the first ever beneficiary ‘impact’ to be held in Auckland has been taking place this week at Onehunga’s Work & Income office.

Sacrifice isn't a popular word, but the government green paper on vulnerable children poses some tough questions for all of us. For one, if we're to really help the worst off, are we prepared to stop judging them?

What price are we willing to pay to make children safer in this country? For all that the timing of the government's green paper conveniently saves National from having to come up with any hard policy until after the election, it does raise the unpopular question of sacrifice and asks what you - and me - are prepared to give up for the sake of tackling our hideous statistics.

The NBR's Rich List today begs us to celebrate the richest of the rich for, well, being rich. Me, I'd like a broader definition of success if it's all the same

Good on 'em, eh. Yeah, those Rich Listers who again are being draped before the nation like so much fine ermine deserve a pat on the back, if for nothing else than the fact that, in most cases, they've shown how to stay in this country and succeed financially.

How many beneficiaries does it take to make a crisis? And what does history tell us? When were benefit numbers at their worst? For all this and more, read on...

The Welfare working Group (WWG) is convinced. There are "major deficiencies" in New Zealand's welfare system. "Fundamental change" is required. The costs are too high and they are ringing the alarm bells.

From eugenics to workfare, the Welfare Working Group report released on Tuesday has the potential to destroy lives, hopes - and our welfare system itself

Right now, I feel a certain reluctance to write about anything except the unfolding tragedy in Christchurch.

As people on facebook and elsewhere keep reminding me, now is not a time for party politics, or for petty factional squabbles which fade into insignificance in the face of Tuesday’s earthquake.