David Cunliffe

Shane Jones wouldn’t be quitting if he thought he was going to be in government next year. His resignation is a very clear warning bell; Labour cannot win if it loses people like Shane Jones and voters who support him.

And Labour cannot keep Shane Jones and the people who support him unless it looks like a party capable of winning, and that means a party that is inclusive, focused on jobs, better pay, and on celebrating opportunities for all of us to do better in life.

I wrote a column in the National Business Review this weekend, and it’s driving right-wingers there nuts.

Bill English believes the government shouldn't bother with trying to promote added value exports. If the market wants raw logs, then that's what we should sell.

Perception matters immensely when it comes to politics, but reality matters even more. So let's talk about realities

Relationship management is a tough part of being a politician, but gee whizz everyone in parliament seems to be falling over themselves to stuff it up this week, from Judith Collins to Shane Jones and beyond.

The announcement of the election date was an opportunity for the left to define the campaign. It can’t afford any more missed opportunities.

It wasn’t like we didn’t know it was coming. The announcement of the date today has highlighted the fact that the left now has six months to add five per cent to its support, find and mobilise a couple of hundred thousand people, change perceptions of the government, announce a manifesto, promote its own vision and raise around a million dollars a month. 

David Cunliffe's Trust and the Dinner at Antoine's were not the same. I wish they were, but they just aren't.

There's been a bit of lefty gloating going on around the traps about Patrick Gower's interview with John Key on The Nation, in which he sought to draw an equivalence between David Cunliffe's use of a trust to receive donations for his Labour leader