poverty

We're obese. We know it and we know about the risks of junk food, poverty and mothers' diets. But if we think organic food can cut our obesity rate, we could be swallowing a whole lot of dodgy – and costly – ideas

The headline in the New Zealand Herald's Element magazine last month certainly hit its targets: "Feeding the nation – obesity, poverty and how to get New Zealand eating its greens".

Anti-government protestors storm Thai PM's compound; Biden works to ease tensions between Japan and China; Kim Jong-un fires his uncle and has two of his aides executed; poverty facilitates return of polygamy in Kazakhstan; number of US banks falls to record low; and more 

Top of the Agenda: Thai Police Defuse Protests

Sir Bob Jones knows there's no such thing as a free lunch, but his cafe codswallop shows the multi-millionaire is woefully ignorant about reality of poverty in New Zealand

The New Zealand Herald a few days back had a column by Bob Jones on the problem of poor people. What he says is stunningly obtuse, and it perpetuates some silly ideas.

The initial response to a call for councils and other big employers to commit to a living wage of at least $18.40 an hour has been dominated by excuses. But what could be more important?

President Barack Obama did the living wage campaign in New Zealand a favour in his State of the Union address yesterday by making a simple declaration. It was wrapped up in his promise to raise the federal minimum wage – something he campaigned on in 2008 but has failed to act upon thus far. But it's something that needs to be put to Prime Minister John Key, amongst others.

Auckland's first-ever beneficiary 'impact' demonstrates poverty of policies as well as of people 

Almost unnoticed in the rush to Christmas, the first ever beneficiary ‘impact’ to be held in Auckland has been taking place this week at Onehunga’s Work & Income office.