RMA

Government's gathering pace, in a way that ought to give us all serious pause - because it rips apart more than our constitutional fabric.

“New Zealand is a remorselessly democratic country.” -- Geoffrey Palmer

In 1977, 341,159 New Zealanders joined the petition of Gwenny Davis to Parliament.

Increasing the supply of housing is only part of the solution. Demand needs to be shored up. That means changing incentives so that wage earners can compete with investors.

When run down villas in Sandringham are fetching up to a $1 million, the average family can't afford to buy the average house.

 Here are two things that the problem of affordability isn't:

It's not a problem of not enough houses being built in the wops. People want to live where they work and play. 

Look deeper into RMA reforms and you might find it's more exciting than you think: an Environment Minister taking her axe to urban trees, and the latest in a series of “democracy deficits” - this time affecting Auckland

Wake up, New Zealand. Yo, Auckland!

I want you - the 87 percent of you who live in a city or town in New Zealand - to have a think about trees. What do trees mean to you?

2012 in review: text of my piece for the Resource Management Journal on the changing legal landscape, and writing loudly on the political wall 

All over the country, on land and at sea, the legal landscape is changing. In pursuit of balance, the National government is rewriting laws that have sustained and built our environment.

The results are good - in parts. Other parts so deeply undermine the precarious balance so far achieved, that they compromise the whole.

In 2012, National Ministers’ environment choices left us 100% poorer - or pooer, in the case of our impure, faecally-contaminated rivers

Three years ago, new to the job, Trade (and former Conservation) Minister Tim Groser said our brand would be built on “world class environmental standards”: