Syria

Ancient Syrian city of Palmyra taken by ISIS; Malaysia orders search and rescue for migrant boats in Andaman Sea; new PM for South Korea; US intelligence releases Bin Laden documents; California declares state of emergency after oil spill; and more

Syria peace talks kick off in Geneva; Indian PM Modi to make first visit to China; South Korea and Vietnam sign free trade agreement; EU revises economic forecast upwards; and more

UN Security Council demands humanitarian access to refugee camp in Syria; explosions at Chinese chemical plant injure 14; Malaysia passes bill to allow suspected terrorists to be detained for up to two years without legal representation; Boko Haram storms village; Rand Paul to run for US President; and more

Iraqi forces march on Tikrit; South Korea slashes interest rates; Thailand-China rubber and rice deal in the works; UN Security Council blasted on Syria response; IMF approves Ukraine loan programme; and more 

TOP OF THE AGENDA

Iraqi Forces March on Tikrit

John Key hasn’t made the case for military intervention, which doesn’t mean there isn’t one.

Making the case means understanding what drives people to join ISIS and resisting the temptation to retro-fit our own causes onto theirs. 

It means staring at the consequences of intervening  - and not intervening.

It requires communicating clearly to New Zealanders, the legal premise for intervention, and telling us what peace looks like.

There are a few myths to debunk first.

The fight against Islamic State is not the fight of the oppressor against the disposed and the poor. Its leaders and disciples are mostly educated and middle class, if not wealthy. It’s the victims in Iraq and Syria who are the poor.