CYF

Oranga Tamariki has a new name, but the same problems and, as we saw in Coroner William Bain's report this week, the same failings. But there is a way to make a difference

Every five weeks. Every 35 days. That's how often, on average, a child is killed in New Zealand. Usually the chid is under five and usually the killer is someone they knew. Knew. Past tense.

Trouble-shooting the CYF reforms: Yes,we need to act, but there are two big political calls underlying the radical overhaul that raise questions about whether this is the best way to go

This is what everyone agrees on: Child, Youth and Family needs to change. No-one can look at how we deal with the troubled kids that need help from government agencies and say it's going swimmingly. So the question is not what we do, but how we do it.

Talk to social workers and experts trying to get New Zealand's most troubled kids safely through to adulthood and the impression left is that the best thing to do may also be the thing that's most politically anathema to this government

When politicians start talking about "radical overhauls" and headlines speak of "sweeping changes", I confess a little scepticism, even nervousness.

Proposed $60 million spend to boost tourism; police called to schools to deal with unruly students; sharp rise in newborns taken into CYF care; three-strikes law could breach human rights; drinking age to be reviewed; Arthur Allan Thomas joins Bain support camp

The Government and tourism operators are considering spending $60 million to boost tourism, one of the "top 20" ideas to emerge from last week's employment summit, reports the Dominion Post.